Diabetes with Chronic Kidney Disease - Comprehensive Test in Bethel Park, Pennsylvania

The Diabetes with Chronic Kidney Disease - Comprehensive panel contains 13 tests with 79 biomarkers.

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The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Apolipoprotein A1

Apolipoprotein B

Apolipoprotein B/A1 Ratio

Also known as: C-Reactive Protein, CReactive Protein CRP, CRP

C-REACTIVE PROTEIN

C-reactive protein is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body.

Also known as: CBC, CBC includes Differential and Platelets, CBC/PLT w/DIFF, Complete Blood Count (includes Differential and Platelets)

Absolute Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Absolute Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Absolute Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Absolute Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Absolute Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

Absolute Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Neutrophils

Neutrophils (neu) normally make up the largest number of circulating WBCs. They move into an area of damaged or infected tissue, where they engulf and destroy bacteria or sometimes fungi. Young neutrophils, recently released into circulation, are called bands.

Absolute Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Absolute Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Hematocrit

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

Hemoglobin

Serum hemoglobin is a blood test that measures the level of free hemoglobin in the liquid part of the blood (the serum). Free hemoglobin is the hemoglobin outside of the red blood cells. Most of the hemoglobin is found inside the red blood cells, not in the serum.

Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

MCH

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is a calculation of the average amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin inside a red blood cell.

MCHC

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average percentage of hemoglobin inside a red cell.

MCV

Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is a measurement of the average size of RBCs.

Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

MPV

Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) - When it indicates average size of platelets are small; older platelets are generally smaller than younger ones and a low MPV may mean that a condition is affecting the production of platelets by the bone marrow. When it indicates a high number of larger, younger platelets in the blood; this may be due to the bone marrow producing and releasing platelets rapidly into circulation.

Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Neutrophils

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed.

Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Platelet Count

A platelet count is a test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. Platelets help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells.

Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

RDW

Red cell distribution width (RDW), which may be included in a CBC, is a calculation of the variation in the size of RBCs.

Reactive Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Red Blood Cell Count

An RBC count is a blood test that tells how many red blood cells (RBCs) you have. RBCs contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. How much oxygen your body tissues get depends on how many RBCs you have and how well they work.

White Blood Cell Count

A WBC count is a test to measure the number of white blood cells (WBCs) in the blood. WBCs help fight infections. They are also called leukocytes. There are five major types of white blood cells: basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes (T cells and B cells), monocytes and neutrophils

Also known as: Chem 12, Chemistry Panel, Chemistry Screen, CMP, Complete Metabolic Panel, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel CMP, SMA 12, SMA 20

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Albumin/Globulin Ratio

The ratio of albumin to globulin (A/G ratio) is calculated from measured albumin and calculated globulin (total protein - albumin). Normally, there is a little more albumin than globulins, giving a normal A/G ratio of slightly over 1. Because disease states affect the relative amounts of albumin and globulin, the A/G ratio may provide a clue as to the cause of the change in protein levels. A low A/G ratio may reflect overproduction of globulins, such as seen in multiple myeloma or autoimmune diseases, or underproduction of albumin, such as may occur with cirrhosis, or selective loss of albumin from the circulation, as may occur with kidney disease (nephrotic syndrome). A high A/G ratio suggests underproduction of immunoglobulins as may be seen in some genetic deficiencies and in some leukemias. More specific tests, such as liver enzyme tests and serum protein electrophoresis, must be performed to make an accurate diagnosis. With a low total protein that is due to plasma expansion (dilution of the blood), the A/G ratio will typically be normal because both albumin and globulin will be diluted to the same extent.

Alkaline Phosphatase

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a protein found in all body tissues. Tissues with higher amounts of ALP include the liver, bile ducts, and bone.

Alt

Alanine transaminase (ALT) is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver. Injury to the liver results in release of the substance into the blood.

AST

AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme found in high amounts in liver, heart, and muscle cells. It is also found in lesser amounts in other tissues.

Bilirubin, Total

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bun/Creatinine Ratio

A ratio between a person’s BUN and blood creatinine to help determine what is causing these concentrations to be higher than normal. The ratio of BUN to creatinine is usually between 10:1 and 20:1. An increased ratio may be due to a condition that causes a decrease in the flow of blood to the kidneys, such as congestive heart failure or dehydration. It may also be seen with increased protein, from gastrointestinal bleeding, or increased protein in the diet. The ratio may be decreased with liver disease (due to decrease in the formation of urea) and malnutrition.

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system.

Carbon Dioxide

CO2 is carbon dioxide. Measures the amount of carbon dioxide in the liquid part of your blood, called the serum. In the body, most of the CO2 is in the form of a substance called bicarbonate (HCO3-). Therefore, the CO2 blood test is really a measure of your blood bicarbonate level.

Chloride

Chloride is a type of electrolyte. It works with other electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These substances help keep the proper balance of body fluids and maintain the body's acid-base balance. This is a measure of the amount of chloride in the fluid portion (serum) of the blood.

Creatinine

The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Egfr African American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Egfr Non-Afr. American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

GFR-NON AFRICAN AMERICAN

Globulin

Globulins is the collective term for most blood proteins other than albumin. Identifying the types of globulins can help diagnose certain disorders. Globulins are roughly divided into three groups: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Gamma globulines include various types of antibodies such as immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A.

Glucose

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including those in the brain. The hormones insulin and glucagon help control blood glucose levels.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral that the body needs to work normally. It helps nerves and muscles communicate. It also helps move nutrients into cells and waste products out of cells. A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium's harmful effects on blood pressure.

Protein, Total

The total protein is the total amount of two classes of proteins, albumin and globulin that are found in the fluid portion of your blood. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Your albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and your globulins are an important part of your immune system.

Sodium

Sodium is a substance that the body needs to work properly it is vital to normal body processes, including nerve and muscle function

Urea Nitrogen (Bun)

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down. BUN measures the amount of urea nitrogen in the blood.

CYSTATIN C

eGFR

Also known as: 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG)., GlycoMark

Glycomark (R)

GLYCOMARK ® measures 1,5 anhydroglucitol, a glucose derived carbohydrate whose urinary excretion varies inversely with mean blood glucose. 1,5 anhydroglucitol appears to integrate variation in mean blood glucose over a period of about two weeks.

Also known as: A1c, Glycated Hemoglobin, Glycohemoglobin, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, HA1c, HbA1c, Hemoglobin A1c, Hemoglobin A1c HgbA1C, Hgb A1c

Hemoglobin A1c

The A1c test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the last 2 to 3 months. It does this by measuring the concentration of glycated (also often called glycosylated) hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin is an oxygen-transporting protein found inside red blood cells (RBCs). There are several types of normal hemoglobin, but the predominant form – about 95-98% – is hemoglobin A. As glucose circulates in the blood, some of it spontaneously binds to hemoglobin A. The hemoglobin molecules with attached glucose are called glycated hemoglobin. The higher the concentration of glucose in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin is formed. Once the glucose binds to the hemoglobin, it remains there for the life of the red blood cell – normally about 120 days. The predominant form of glycated hemoglobin is referred to as HbA1c or A1c. A1c is produced on a daily basis and slowly cleared from the blood as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test is used to monitor treatment in someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes. It helps to evaluate how well their glucose levels have been controlled by treatment over time. This test may be used to screen for and diagnose diabetes or risk of developing diabetes. In 2010, clinical practice guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) stated that A1c may be added to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an option for diabetes screening and diagnosis. For monitoring purposes, an A1c of less than 7% indicates good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics. However, in 2012, the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) issued a position statement recommending that the management of glucose control in type 2 diabetes be more "patient-centered." Data from recent studies have shown that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause complications and that people with risk of severe hypoglycemia, underlying health conditions, complications, and a limited life expectancy do not necessarily benefit from having a stringent goal of less than 7% for their A1c. The statement recommends that people work closely with their doctor to select a goal that reflects each person's individual health status and that balances risks and benefits.

Also known as: Insulin (fasting)

Insulin

Insulin is a hormone that is produced and stored in the beta cells of the pancreas. It is vital for the transportation and storage of glucose at the cellular level, helps regulate blood glucose levels, and has a role in lipid metabolism. When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, insulin is released to allow glucose to move into tissue cells, especially muscle and adipose (fat) cells, where is it is used for energy production. Insulin then prompts the liver to either store the remaining excess blood glucose as glycogen for short-term energy storage and/or to use it to produce fatty acids. The fatty acids are eventually used by adipose tissue to synthesize triglycerides to form the basis of a longer term, more concentrated form of energy storage. Without insulin, glucose cannot reach most of the body's cells. Without glucose, the cells starve and blood glucose levels rise to unhealthy levels. This can cause disturbances in normal metabolic processes that result in various disorders, including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and vision and neurological problems. Thus, diabetes, a disorder associated with decreased insulin effects, is eventually a life-threatening condition.

Also known as: Lipid Panel with Ratios (fasting), Lipid Profile with Ratios (fasting), Lipids

Chol/HDLC Ratio

Cholesterol, Total

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood and stick to the walls of your arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can narrow your arteries or even block them. High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase your risk of heart disease. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. You are likely to have high cholesterol if members of your family have it, if you are overweight or if you eat a lot of fatty foods. You can lower your cholesterol by exercising more and eating more fruits and vegetables. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol.

HDL Cholesterol

LDL-Cholesterol

LDL/HDL Ratio

Non HDL Cholesterol

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. This test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Most triglycerides are found in fat (adipose) tissue, but some triglycerides circulate in the blood to provide fuel for muscles to work. After a person eats, an increased level of triglycerides is found in the blood as the body converts the energy not needed right away into fat. Triglycerides move via the blood from the gut to adipose tissue for storage. In between meals, triglycerides are released from fat tissue to be used as an energy source for the body. Most triglycerides are carried in the blood by lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the reason for this is not well understood. Certain factors can contribute to high triglyceride levels and to risk of CVD, including lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking cigarettes, consuming excess alcohol, and medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease.

Also known as: Microalbumin Random Urine with Creatinine

Creatinine, Random Urine

Microalbumin

Microalbumin/Creatinine

Also known as: Inorganic Phosphate, P, Phosphate as Phosphorus, Phosphorus, PO4

Phosphate (As Phosphorus)

This test is performed to see how much phosphorus in your blood. Kidney, liver, and certain bone diseases can cause abnormal phosphorus levels.

Also known as: "Biointact" PTH and Calcium, Intact PTH and Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone and Calcium, PTH and Calcium, PTH Intact and Calcium

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system.

PARATHYROID HORMONE,

PTH stands for parathyroid hormone. It is a protein hormone released by the parathyroid gland. Parathyroid hormone controls calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and bone. Release of PTH is controlled by the level of calcium in the blood. Low blood calcium levels cause increased PTH to be released, while high blood calcium levels block PTH release.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D2

Vitamin D2 ((ergocalciferol,) is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D2 is effective when it is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D3

Vitamin D3 (cholecalcifero) which comes from animals. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D3 are is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

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Patient Service Center
1300 Oxford Dr Ste 1700
Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 15102 Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 412-835-6300
Hours
  • M-Th 6:00 am-6:00 pm | F 6:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Th 10:00 am-6:00 pm | F 10:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
5219 Library Rd South Park Shops Unit E9
Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 15102 Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 412-833-2131
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
642 Washington Rd
Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania 15228 Map
Distance 3.20 miles
Phone 412-341-3031
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4225 Brownsville Rd Shoppes at Brentwood
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15227 Map
Distance 5.10 miles
Phone 412-882-6727
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 9:00 am-12:00 pm Quantiferon: M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
969 Greentree Rd Second Fl
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15220 Map
Distance 6.70 miles
Phone 412-922-0215
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-6:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-6:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1061 Washington Ave
Carnegie, Pennsylvania 15106 Map
Distance 7.10 miles
Phone 412-429-1307
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2000 Mary St Second Fl
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15203 Map
Distance 7.50 miles
Phone 412-481-1248
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:30 am & 12:00 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:30 am & 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1907 Lebanon Church Rd Ste 104
West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 15122 Map
Distance 7.60 miles
Phone 412-650-8916
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-5:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-5:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1015 Waterdam Plaza Dr
Mc Murray, Pennsylvania 15317 Map
Distance 8.00 miles
Phone 724-941-9492
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-4:00 pm

Patient Service Center
5484 Campbells Run Rd
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15205 Map
Distance 8.70 miles
Phone 412-787-1035
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
526 Penn Ave
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 Map
Distance 8.90 miles
Phone 412-434-1304
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-10:15 am & 11:00 am-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-10:15 am & 11:00 am-1:30 pm

Patient Service Center
120 Lytton Ave Ste 100 C
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Map
Distance 9.40 miles
Phone 412-681-7669
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4815 Centre Ave Ste 106
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Map
Distance 9.40 miles
Phone 412-681-0513
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
2727 Murray Ave
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15217 Map
Distance 9.60 miles
Phone 412-521-1544
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
2336 Ardmore Blvd Ardmore Shopping Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15221 Map
Distance 11.80 miles
Phone 412-271-1121
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2001 Lincoln Way Ste 270, Oak Park Mall
White Oak, Pennsylvania 15131 Map
Distance 12.30 miles
Phone 412-678-1484
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-4:00 pm

Patient Service Center
50 Freeport Rd Unit 400
Aspinwall, Pennsylvania 15215 Map
Distance 14.20 miles
Phone 412-782-3024
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
12240 Frankstown Rd
Penn Hills, Pennsylvania 15235 Map
Distance 14.20 miles
Phone 412-793-2333
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1600 Coraopolis Heights Rd Ste G
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 15108 Map
Distance 15.40 miles
Phone 412-262-4640
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4771 McKnight Rd
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237 Map
Distance 15.50 miles
Phone 412-366-6660
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-5:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
8856 Covenant Ave
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237 Map
Distance 15.50 miles
Phone 412-630-2650
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-11:45 am & 12:30 pm-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-11:45 am & 12:30 pm-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1742 William Flynn Hwy
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 15116 Map
Distance 15.80 miles
Phone 412-486-2404
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-11:15 am & 12:00 pm-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-11:15 am & 12:00 pm-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4627 Route 51 Willowbrook Plaza
Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania 15012 Map
Distance 15.90 miles
Phone 724-379-6000
Hours
Call for appointment.

Patient Service Center
760 Tri County Lane Ste 104
Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania 15012 Map
Distance 15.90 miles
Phone 724-929-2939
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3824 Northern Pike Ste 125
Monroeville, Pennsylvania 15146 Map
Distance 16.10 miles
Phone 412-372-2898
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
600 Oxford Dr Ste 110
Monroeville, Pennsylvania 15146 Map
Distance 16.10 miles
Phone 412-372-3027
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
2644 Mosside Blvd. Rt 48 Mosside Village Shopping Center
Monroeville, Pennsylvania 15146 Map
Distance 16.10 miles
Phone 412-373-6848
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
360 Washington Rd
Washington, Pennsylvania 15301 Map
Distance 16.10 miles
Phone 724-222-4224
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:00 am & 11:30 am-2:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-11:00 am & 11:30 am-2:30 pm

Patient Service Center
8943 State Route 30
Irwin, Pennsylvania 15642 Map
Distance 16.40 miles
Phone 724-863-1578
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4490 Mt. Royal Blvd Suite 2300
Allison Park, Pennsylvania 15101 Map
Distance 18.10 miles
Phone 412-486-3232
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2362 Golden Mile HWY Route 286
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15239 Map
Distance 18.90 miles
Phone 724-387-2260
Hours
Call for appointment.

Patient Service Center
313 Unity Center Road
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15239 Map
Distance 18.90 miles
Phone 412-793-6500
Hours
Call for appointment.

Patient Service Center
2000 Village Run Dr Village at Pine Shopping Plaza
Wexford, Pennsylvania 15090 Map
Distance 21.20 miles
Phone 724-933-3266
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
832 Merchant St
Ambridge, Pennsylvania 15003 Map
Distance 21.40 miles
Phone 724-266-0087
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Sa 10:00 am-11:45 am

Patient Service Center
4889 William Penn Hwy Walnut Hollow Shopping Center
Murrysville, Pennsylvania 15668 Map
Distance 21.70 miles
Phone 724-327-7623
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
5513 William Flynn Hwy Ste 500
Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 15044 Map
Distance 22.10 miles
Phone 724-444-8460
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
100 Tarentum Bridge Road Riverview Plaza
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 15068 Map
Distance 23.60 miles
Phone 724-337-3121
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
520 Northpointe Circle The Terrance at Northpointe
Seven Fields, Pennsylvania 16046 Map
Distance 26.20 miles
Phone 724-778-8066
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2510 Greengate Centre Circle Greengate Centre
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 15601 Map
Distance 26.40 miles
Phone 724-853-6768
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-2:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
5240 Route 30 Ste B
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 15601 Map
Distance 26.40 miles
Phone 724-834-6001
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-2:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:30 pm

Patient Service Center
20325 Route 19N Cranberry Gardens Plaza, Unit 14
Cranberry Twp, Pennsylvania 16066 Map
Distance 26.90 miles
Phone 724-776-3223
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
1604 Burtner Rd
Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania 15065 Map
Distance 27.10 miles
Phone 724-224-8220
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3136 West St
Weirton, West Virginia 26062 Map
Distance 29.20 miles
Phone 304-748-2828
Hours
  • M,W,F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | T,Th 8:00 am-6:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
397 Hyde Park Rd Allegheny Town Sq, Ste 100B
Leechburg, Pennsylvania 15656 Map
Distance 30.90 miles
Phone 724-845-1723
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1701 Third Street
Beaver, Pennsylvania 15009 Map
Distance 31.20 miles
Phone 724-728-0884
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-10:45 am & 11:30 am-2:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-10:45 am & 11:30 am-2:30 pm

Patient Service Center
404 West Main St
Uniontown, Pennsylvania 15401 Map
Distance 33.90 miles
Phone 724-430-9690
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 10:00 am-11:00 am

Patient Service Center
200 Luray Dr
Wintersville, Ohio 43953 Map
Distance 34.90 miles
Phone 740-314-8258
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-6:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1151 Washington St
Newell, West Virginia 26050 Map
Distance 36.20 miles
Phone 304-459-4010
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-8:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-6:00 pm

Patient Service Center
285 Pa State Rt 288 Franklin Plaza Room 1384
Ellwood City, Pennsylvania 16117 Map
Distance 39.60 miles
Phone 724-758-7070
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-1:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-1:30 pm

Patient Service Center
1700 New Butler Road Giant Eagle Plaza Ste 101
New Castle, Pennsylvania 16101 Map
Distance 46.60 miles
Phone 724-658-7722
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
2004 W State St Westgate Plaza Upmc Building
New Castle, Pennsylvania 16101 Map
Distance 46.60 miles
Phone 724-658-7711
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Patient Service Center
951 E Market St
Cadiz, Ohio 43907 Map
Distance 51.70 miles
Phone 740-942-4631
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm

Patient Service Center
146 Enclave Dr
New Castle, Pennsylvania 16105 Map
Distance 52.80 miles
Phone 724-657-6767
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-2:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:30 am-1:30 pm

Patient Service Center
22 McClurg Rd Ste B
Youngstown, Ohio 44512 Map
Distance 58.80 miles
Phone 330-729-2712
Hours
  • M-Th 7:30 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-4:30 pm | F 7:30 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Th 10:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-4:00 pm | F 10:00 am-11:30 am

Patient Service Center
7629 Market St Ste 125
Youngstown, Ohio 44512 Map
Distance 58.80 miles
Phone 330-758-6600
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-4:30 pm

Patient Service Center
1098 E State St Ste C
Salem, Ohio 44460 Map
Distance 59.20 miles
Phone 234-320-0038
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 8:30 am-10:30 am